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Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden Dorothee Dähler & Kaj Lehmann: Walden

Schloss Hollenegg for Design is an initiative by the curator Alice Stori Liechtenstein. She invites emerging industrial designers for a residency at the castle in Hollenegg, Austria, and exhibits their work once a year.

For 2019, the title of the show was Walden borrowed from Henry David Thoreau’s book of the same title. In Walden, Thoreau recounts his experience of living in the forest by the shores of Walden Pond. In 1845, he moved into a small house he built himself, on a land owned by his friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, a form of social experiment that would allow him to live like a spartan to discover life’s true essential needs.

Cover, Walden, Henry David Thoreau

Cover, Walden, Henry David Thoreau

Walden explores the role design could have in promoting more considerate behaviours. The projects developed for the exhibition are incredibly diverse, and that shows how broad, complex and open to interpretation the subject is. Many are about selfsufficiency: what one can do with the materials that are freely available to us such as mud, mycelium or human waste. Others try to foster a sensitivity that could help us develop new approaches to doing, making, living. Walden wants to offer a hopeful message and aims to encourage a shift in attitudes; one that would allow us to acknowledge the importance of progress, wealth and technology, while living respectful of our environment, with the simplicity of the philosopher.

Alice Story Liechtenstein

To reflect the ideas behind the exhibition we looked into sustainable ways of printing. We came across a font that is called ecofont that was designed with holes inside the letters which will require less ink for printing.

A version of this font in which the holes were replaced with shapes of seeds was used for this identity.

Example of an ecofont

Example of an ecofont

The invitation was printed on seed paper, which is a special eco-friendly paper made from post-consumer materials embedded with wildflower, herb or vegetable seeds. When you plant the paper in a pot of soil or outside in a garden, the seeds in the paper germinate and grow into plants. Hence each guest could eventually grow their own plants.

Ultimately the exhibition didn’t happen as planned, because of covid-19. The catalog therefore showcases an exhibition that has never opened to the public.

Insta-story of an invited guest—showing the planted invitation.

Insta-story of an invited guest—showing the planted invitation.